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February 2016

Calls for Papers and Conferences

Chicago Ethnography Conference 2016

The Department of Sociology at DePaul University is pleased to announce the 18th Annual Chicago Ethnography Conference. This annual graduate student conference is hosted on a rotating basis by one of several Chicago-area Sociology departments, including DePaul University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Loyola University, Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, University of Notre Dame, the University of Chicago, and University of Illinois at Chicago. The conference provides an opportunity for graduate students to share their ethnographic scholarship with one another and get feedback from faculty and other graduate students based in the Chicago area and beyond. This year’s conference will be held at DePaul University in Chicago, IL on Saturday April 30, 2016.

This is an invitation for graduate students to apply to present their original ethnographic and qualitative research at the conference. The theme of this year’s conference is “Beyond the Case Study: Connecting Theory and Generalizability.”  The keynote speakers are Michael Burawoy and Claudio Benzecry. Abstract submissions are due March 1, 2016 (please note the deadline is incorrectly listed as Jan. 1 on the website).

Specific information about abstract submissions and the conference can be found on our website at chicagoethnography.wordpress.com

 

“Can Comparative Historical Sociology Save the World?”

Mini-Conference of the Comparative Historical Sociology Section

Friday, August 19, 2016, Seattle, WA

*Deadline for paper submission has been extended to February 5th, 2016.

The Comparative Historical Sociology section of the American Sociological Association and the Equality Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) program at Northwestern University are pleased to announce a mini-conference entitled “Can Comparative Historical Sociology Save the World?” The conference will take place August 19, 2016 at the University of Washington in Seattle.

We live in a world where the most important policy concerns, from terrorism and climate change to the fight against poverty and infectious disease, transcend national borders. This conference explores how scholars might use the tools of comparative and historical sociology to engage issues of public concern. An opening plenary session moderated by Professor Monica Prasad will engage both advanced and early-stage scholars in conversation on this issue. Other sessions will be organized around the papers accepted through this call.

We encourage paper submissions from scholars at all career stages, from sociology and other disciplines. We are especially interested in submissions that employ comparative and historical methods to examine important issues of our day, such as (but not limited to) global market regulation, questions of immigration and citizenship, poverty, environmental insecurity, and protracted race, gender and class inequality. We also invite submissions reflecting on the tradition of policy-relevant research in comparative historical sociology, as well as what the role of comparative and historical methods could or should be in public debate.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 500 words through the electronic abstract submission form: http://form.jotform.us/form/52724660569160. The deadline for paper submission is February 5th, 2016.

Conference participants and attendees will be asked to contribute a participation fee of $25 for faculty and $15 for students. Funding to defray costs of travel and lodging will be awarded on a lottery basis for interested graduate students and term faculty participants. Announcements about travel awards will be made after papers are accepted. For questions, please contact the planning committee at chsminicon@gmail.com. The organizing committee: Johnnie Lotesta, Aliza Luft, Josh McCabe, Andre Joshua Nickow, Sarah Quinn, Fiona Rose-Greenland, and Eric Schoon.

Call for Nominations

The Beth B. Hess Memorial Scholarship

 History and Overview

 The Beth B. Hess Memorial Scholarship will be awarded to an advanced sociology Ph.D. student who began her or his study in a community college or technical school. A student advanced to candidacy (ABD status) in an accredited Ph.D. program in sociology in the U.S. is eligible to apply if she or he studied at a U.S. two-year college either part-time or full-time for the equivalent of at least one full academic year that was not part of a high-school dual-enrolment or enrichment program.

The Scholarship carries a stipend of $15,000 from Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) with assistance from the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) to be used to support the pursuit of a Ph.D., as well as one-year memberships in SWS (including a subscription to Gender & Society) and SSSP. The first award payment of $7500 will be given at the SWS Summer banquet, with the second $7500 payment to come at the SWS Winter meeting. Recognizing Beth Hess’s significant contributions to the American Sociological Association (ASA), ASA joins SWS and SSSP in supporting and celebrating the awardee at their Annual Meeting. The awardee’s economy class airfare, train fare or driving mileage/tolls will be paid jointly by SWS and SSSP. ASA also supports applicants for this award via their student travel award program (more than one such award may be given, but students must apply to ASA separately). Each association will also waive its meeting registration and provide complementary banquet and/or reception tickets for the awardee.

What We’ll Be Looking For

 To honor Beth Hess’s career, the committee will be looking for:

 

  • Commitment to teaching, especially at a community college or other institution serving less-privileged students.
  • Research and/or activism in social inequality, social justice, or social problems, with a focus on gender and/or gerontology being especially positive
  • Service to the academic and/or local community, including mentoring
  • High quality research and writing in the proposal and letter of application.

 

The Application

 Applications for the award should be sent electronically as a single Word or RTF file via e-mail attachment to: Sarah Bruch (sarah-bruch@uiowa.edu).

Applications must contain in the following order:

  1. A cover sheet with:
    • Name and full contact information, including phone and email
    • Current academic affiliation, with years attended and expected degree date
    • Community college or technical school attended, with years and number of credits completed
    • Name and contact information for graduate faculty reference
    • If included, name of honored faculty member
  2. A letter of application (no more than 2 pages) describing the student’s decision to study sociology, commitment to teaching, career goals, research agenda, dissertation project, service and activism that would help the committee to see how the Scholarship would be a fitting honor. Approximately one page should be devoted to a dissertation summary statement including progress to date.
  3. Full curriculum vitae, including all schools, degrees awarded, dates/years of study, and full or part-time status in each.
  4. (Optional) A one-page letter describing a community/technical college faculty member who contributed in a significant way to the decision to study sociology or pursue higher education.

Applicants should also arrange for the following to be sent directly either electronically via e-mail attachment or in hard copy:

  1. A letter confirming advancement to candidacy (ABD status) in a sociology Ph.D. program and aid award, if any. ABD status is required.
  2. A letter of recommendation from a sociologist.
  3. Transcript (official or unofficial) from the community or technical college attended.

 

Only the enrollment confirmation, letter of recommendation, and transcript will be accepted in hard copy. Electronic copies of these materials are preferred and should be sent directly by the individual or institution supplying them. Hard copies can be mailed directly to:

 Sarah Bruch, Department of Sociology, 130 Seashore Hall West, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242

 To be considered, all application materials (electronic and hard copy) must be RECEIVED by April 1, 2016.

For further information contact Sarah Bruch (sarah-bruch@uiowa.edu)This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

January 2016

Calls for Papers and Conferences

Democratic Engagement From All Angles”

12th Annual Southern California Graduate Student Conference

Saturday, May 7, 2016, Jack W. Peltason Center for the Study of Democracy

The Center for the Study of Democracy, University of California, Irvine is pleased to announce the Twelfth Annual Southern California Graduate Student Conference on Democracy to be held at UCI.

Doctoral students from California universities are invited to send their project proposals on research related to empirical issues of democracy at home and abroad, such as:

  • The problems facing the democratic process in the United States, West Europe or other established democracies
  • The development of sustainable democracies in Eastern Europe, East Asia, and other new democracies
  • Sociological and economic conditions related to democratic development, such as inequalities
  • The role of citizens within the democratic process and methods to expand citizen access and influence
  • Democracy within institutions and social/political groups
  • Democracy and markets
  • International aspects of democracy promotion
  • The “Democratic Peace” thesis
  • The Democratic implications of new forms of communication and participation
  • The role of information in Democratization in the developing world
  • The role of Direct Democracy in national and subnational politics

The conference will provide an excellent venue for doctoral students to receive expert guidance on, and support for, projects on democracy-related topics. Faculty from UCI and possibly other California universities will serve as discussants. In addition, we anticipate publication of the best of the conference papers by the University of California’s eRepository.

To submit a paper proposal for potential inclusion in this conference, please e-mail a one page abstract (150 words) by March 11th to Shani Brasier at (csd@uci.edu). Please include your name, a one paragraph biography, the name of a faculty member familiar with the proposed research, and a brief statement of the current research progress on the proposed paper (e.g. completed data collection, finished with analysis, completed first full draft).

The participants in the program will be notified by March 16th; completed papers should be submitted by April 28th for distribution to participants.  Travel expenses will be covered up to $200 if coming by air or $100 if driving.

The New Economy


ASA pre-conference hosted by the Economic Sociology Section

Economic Sociology Section of the ASA is pleased to announce a one-day conference on The New Economy to be held on August 19, 2016 at the University of Washington, Seattle.

The crises of late-stage capitalism has led to a series of crises, including global threats to sustainability, security and democracy. It has also created technologies and opportunities that are giving rise to new forms of organization, new systems of work, new markets, new global flows of people, new goods and capital, and new institutional and cultural frameworks. These macro-level changes, in turn, result in profound transformations of social life at the microlevel: new social identities, new forms of adaption, and the new sites of struggle and resistance. The city of Seattle is a particularly fertile ground for addressing these concerns, given its rich and important history of innovation, labor movements and its position as one of the fastest growing cities in the U.S.

The mini-conference will address the transformation of the old economic forms and the emergence of the new ones. In particular, we encourage papers that focus on:

*changes in organizational forms and institutional arrangements
*the emergence of new forms of work and employment, including the so-called “sharing economy” *new patterns of consumption
*how new forms of work and patterns of consumption influence social identities
*new types of markets
*new forms of money and currency
*new patterns of lending and finance
*new digital and information infrastructures, and implications for surveillance and control
*effects of economic changes on social cohesion and social autonomy
*forms of economic adaptation and forms of resistance to these changes
*effects of all those innovations on sustainability, inequality and social justice
*theoretical approaches to studying these issues

Conference sponsors: Socio-Economic Review University of Oxford Boston University University of Washington

Extended abstracts (up to 500 words) should be submitted to theneweconomy2016@gmail.com by February 15, 2016.

Participants would be asked to register and pay onsite registration fee of $20 for faculty and $10 for graduate students. Lunch would be provided.

Please email aguseva@bu.edu if you would like to volunteer for the conference.

Center for Equitable Growth Announces 2016 Request for Proposals

Washington Center for Equitable Growth has recently announced its 2016 Request for Proposals. As an Equitable Growth grantee, your help in spreading the word about our grant program would be extremely valuable.  We would appreciate it if you emailed colleagues and graduate students to let them know about this funding opportunity.  As in previous years, we are interested in research investigating the various channels through which economic inequality may, or may not, impact economic growth and stability, including both direct and indirect pathways.  For more information:

http://equitablegrowth.org/grant-program/

Or contact Korin Davis, kdavis@equitablegrowth.org

Job Postings

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Diablo Valley College, one of Northern California’s premier community colleges, is hiring a sociologist for a tenure-track position beginning in August, 2016 .. We seek candidates to teach excellent courses on social justice, ethnic studies, and/or woman’s studies and/or sexualities studies, as well as Introduction to Sociology and Social Problems. We seek candidates with the proven ability to teach students of diverse ethnic backgrounds and cultures and with a demonstrated commitment to equitable student learning and success who have a proven ability to teach rigorous lower division sociology courses to students of a wide variety of backgrounds and learning abilities. Closing date for applications is January 20, 2016. The application, full job description and explanation of the application process can be found at: https://www.4cdcareers.net/postings/3140.

Call for Nominations

ASA Call for Nominations

From now and until January 29, 2016, ASA is accepting nominations for its nine major awards. Each August the American Sociological Association proudly presents awards to individuals and groups deserving of recognition.

ASA members are encouraged to submit nominations for the following ASA awards. The deadline for nominations is provided with each award criteria. Each award selection committee is appointed by Committee on Committees and approved by ASA Council. The award selection committees are constituted to review nominations. These awards are presented at the ASA Annual Meeting each August. Remember! The deadline for submission of nominations is January 29, 2016. Currently, the ASA presents the following awards:

Any questions or concerns should be sent to Governance at governance@asanet.org. We hope you will help us find those special sociologists who deserve this kind of recognition.

December 2015

Calls for Papers and Conferences

ASA 2016 IPM Section Sessions

Mixed Methods Approaches to Studying Marginalized Groups (open session), Organized by Megan Comfort, RTI

Description: In an era of extreme poverty, underfunded social services, and a culture that tends to blame people for their own suffering, it is more urgent than ever for social scientists to develop ways to ethically and effectively engage marginalized people in research.  This session will focus on innovative, mixed methods approaches to reaching, involving, and retaining study participants who are likely to slip through the cracks of more traditional research.  Session speakers will address such questions as: In addition to “mixing” qualitative and quantitative methods, how can researchers integrate therapeutic, public health, visual art, technological, and other approaches to enrich both the experience of participating in research and the depth of analysis?  How can methodological innovations be used to expand our thinking about the researcher-participant relationship?  What ethical issues beyond “the protection of human subjects” arise when conducting research with marginalized groups, and what possibilities do mixed methods bring to addressing those?

Economic Inequality and Institutions (open session), Organized by Christine Percheski, Northwestern University

Description: In the United States and many industrialized countries, economic inequality has increased substantially over the past four decades. This session will examine how non-labor market institutions–including educational institutions, political institutions, families, the military, and prisons–create and perpetuate economic inequality in the U.S. and across the globe.
Criminal Justice Contact and Inequality (open session), Organized by Kristin Turney, University of California-Irvine

Description: This panel will consider the implications of the criminal justice contact for the perpetuation of inequality, barriers to mobility, and enhanced risk of poverty.

How and Why Black and Brown Lives Matter (open session), Organized by Sandra Susan Smith, University of California-Berkeley

Description: In post-racial America, recent events, publicized widely, have inspired new theories and stimulated innovative empirical research about the extent to which, how, and why race and ethnicity shape our life chances and color our experiences. This panel of speakers will present new research that offers new ways of understanding the role that race plays in contemporary American society.

Raising Standards for Low-Wage Workers: New Organizing Campaigns, Economic Impacts, and Private Employer Strategies (invited session), Organized by Annette Bernhardt, University of California-Berkeley

Description: While sociologists have long been interested in growing inequality and changes in the employment contract, these topics have gained increasing attention from politicians, the media, and the public in recent years.  A new generation of low-wage worker campaigns has spread across the US and abroad, headed by the fast food workers’ Fight for $15.  Unions are developing new approaches to organizing; state and local activists are winning innovative policies in the areas of wage standards, fair scheduling policies, and paid leave; and several major private employers have moved to adopt work-and-family supportive practices related to scheduling and fringe benefits.  This panel will present new research on these policies and organizing campaigns.

Section on Inequality, Poverty and Mobility Refereed Roundtables (one-hour), Organized by David Pedulla, University of Texas at Austin

Human Rights Working Paper Series

The Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice at the University of Texas at Austin is currently soliciting papers for its Human Rights Working Paper Series. The Human Rights Working Paper Series (WPS) is dedicated to interdisciplinary and critical dialogue on international human rights law and discourse. It publishes innovative papers of the highest quality by established and early-career researchers and practitioners, from the University of Texas and other institutions around the world.

The WPS provides authors with an opportunity to receive feedback on works in progress. It also seeks to provide a lively, productive environment for debate about human rights among academics, policymakers, practitioners, and the wider public. To this end we are launching a blog in the academic year 2015-2016 to host conversations, debates, and commentary related to  the papers.

We encourage submissions from scholars of  all disciplines as well as from  activists and advocates. This year we are particularly interested in papers exploring the relationship between human rights and inequality, natural resource governance, and the future of labor.

The WPS is edited and coordinated by an interdisciplinary committee that includes graduate students and faculty from across the University of Texas. Submissions are received on a rolling basis, reviewed, and then published online. This offers authors the opportunity to actively receive feedback and encourages readers to engage in debates surrounding human rights and social justice.

For more information, please visit:  sites.utexas.edu/rapoportcenterwps/

or contact:  rcwps@law.utexas.edu

Precarious Work: Domination and Resistance in the US, China, and the World

Friday 19 August 2016, Seattle, USA

http://irle.ucla.edu/events/PrecariousWork.php

Today precarious work presents perhaps the greatest global challenge to worker well-being, and has become a major rallying point for worker mobilization around the world.  This conference focuses on analyzing the growth of precarious employment and informal labor, its consequences for workers and their families, the challenges it poses to worker organizing and collective mobilization, and how workers and other social actors are responding to precariousness. We seek to understand the patterns of social and economic domination of labor shaped by the state, capital, gender, class, age, ethnicity, skills, and citizenship, and examine the manifestations of labor resistance and acquiescence in their specific contexts.

The conference is initiated by the American Sociological Association (ASA)’s Labor and Labor Movements Section, the International Sociological Association (ISA)’s Research Committee on Labor Movements (RC44), and the Chinese Sociological Association’s China Association of Work and Labor (CAWL). It builds in part on an ongoing scholarly exchange between the ASA Labor Section and the CAWL. The conference program will focus on the United States and China, but will include a range of global cases and perspectives. Interdisciplinary approaches and innovative research methods are welcomed.

We invite original contributions from academics (including young scholars, graduate students, post-docs, and early career researchers), labor organizers, and other practitioners. Completed papers are expected for the conference, and the selected papers will be peer-reviewed for academic publications. Special issues may appear in:

  • Critical Sociology
  • Global Labour Journal
  • International Journal of Comparative Sociology
  • and an edited book series of Brill Publications

The conference will take place on Friday 19 August 2016 (the day before the ASA Annual Meeting), in a downtown Seattle location close to the ASA site. It will run all day from 8:30am to 6:00pm. It is a valuable opportunity for participants to present new research projects, to find out about cutting edge scholarly work, and to network with researchers at home and abroad.

We encourage people to submit abstracts aimed at a number of provisionally planned sessions:

Planned panel session topics

  • Precarious labor in the United States and Canada
  • Migrant labor, precarious work, and development in comparative perspective: Lessons from China
  • Countering precarious work: Labor activism, state policy, and trade union reform in China
  • Gender and sexuality in precarious work in China
  • The organization of precarious work
  • Resistance and mobilization in non-traditional workplaces and the “gig economy”
  • Informal worker organizing around the world
  • State policy: Regulating or facilitating precarious work?
  • Labor and broader sociopolitical mobilizations in a world of precarious work

Apart from the proposed session topics, we also encourage participants to submit work that examines how precarious work is supported, challenged, and complicated by other social categories, processes, and lenses, such as:

Cross-cutting themes

  • Migration
  • Gender, work, and social reproduction
  • Identity in worker action
  • New and old organizational forms
  • Public policies to address precarious employment
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Young workers
  • Global comparisons and contrasts
  • Global production networks and workers’ solidarity networks

The highlighted themes are in line with emergent and consequential developments related to the organization and proliferation of precarious work in the United States, China, and the world. Your specific topics that fit the conference aims are also welcome.

Submission deadline

The deadline for abstract submission is 23:59 on 31 January 2016 (UTC or Coordinated Universal Time, which is US Eastern Time + 5 or Beijing Time – 8). Please write in English. Send your maximum 250-word abstract (including title of session to which you would like to submit it), full name, institution, and email contact to Brittney Lee at blee@irle.ucla.edu

Results will be notified by email on 1 March 2016.

Paper submission

Each presenter should submit a maximum 9,000-word full paper, including notes and references, by 15 July 2016.

Conference registration fee

No charge for conference registration.

Cosponsors

Initiators:

  • ASA Labor and Labor Movements Section
  • China Association of Work and Labor
  • International Sociological Association Research Committee on Labor Movements (RC44)

Other sponsors

  • ASA Collective Behavior and Social Movements Section
  • ASA Organizations, Occupations, and Work Section
  • ASA Political Economy of the World System Section
  • ASA Section on Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility
  • Critical Sociology Journal
  • Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies, University of Washington
  • Puffin Foundation
  • Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP)
  • UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment

Planning Committee Members

  • Jon Agnone, University of Washington
  • Jenny Chan, University of Oxford
  • Wilma Dunaway, Virginia Tech
  • David Fasenfest, Wayne State University
  • Elizabeth Ford, Seattle University
  • Andrew Hedden, Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies
  • Jasmine Kerrissey, UMass Amherst
  • Chun-Yi Lee, University of Nottingham
  • Manjusha Nair, National University of Singapore
  • Amanda Pullum, Duke University
  • Chris Rhomberg, Fordham University
  • Jennie Romich, University of Washington
  • Jeffrey Rothstein, Grand Valley State University
  • Brian Serafini, University of Washington
  • David A. Smith, University of California, Irvine
  • Chris Tilly, UCLA
  • Carolyn Pinedo Turnovsky, University of Washington
  • Lu Zhang, Temple University
    For further information: http://irle.ucla.edu/events/PrecariousWork.php or contact Chris Tilly, tilly@ucla.edu

International Conference on “Occupations, Skills, and the Labor Market”

Date: March 18-19, 2016

Location: Mannheim Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Germany

The conference focuses on occupations and skills in industrialized countries and on the ways these interact with employment, wages, and participation in the labor market and social inequality. We invite empirical and theoretical contributions on this topic from all areas of economics, personnel economics, and sociology.

Keynote speakers: David Autor (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Iourii Manovskii (University of Pennsylvania), and Kim Weeden (Cornell University)

Participation: Please submit full papers (preliminary versions are welcome) in PDF to Arne Jonas Warnke via e-mail: dfg1764@zew.de. If possible include up to four JEL Codes. Travel and accommodation costs will be reimbursed for speakers (one speaker per paper).

Deadline for paper submission: December 15, 2015

Decision of acceptance will be reached by: January 25, 2016

Scientific committee: Gerard van den Berg (University of Mannheim), Christian Dustmann (University College London), Bernd Fitzenberger (Humboldt University of Berlin), Markus Gangl (Goethe University Frankfurt), Stephen Machin (University College London and Centre for Economic Performance), and Alexandra Spitz-Oener (Humboldt University of Berlin).

The conference is sponsored by the German Research Foundation (DFG) as part of the Priority Programme, “The German Labour Market in a Globalised World – Challenges through Trade, Technology, and Demographics” (SPP 1764).

“Can Comparative Historical Sociology Save the World?” Mini-Conference of the Comparative Historical Sociology Section (Friday, August 19, 2016|Seattle, Washington)

The Comparative Historical Sociology section of the American Sociological Association and the Equality Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) program at Northwestern University are pleased to announce a mini-conference entitled “Can Comparative Historical Sociology Save the World?” The conference will take place August 19, 2016 at the University of Washington in Seattle.

We live in a world where the most important policy concerns, from terrorism and climate change to the fight against poverty and infectious disease, transcend national borders. This conference explores how scholars might use the tools of comparative and historical sociology to engage issues of public concern. An opening plenary session moderated by Professor Monica Prasad will engage both advanced and early-stage scholars in conversation on this issue. Other sessions will be organized around the papers accepted through this call.

We encourage paper submissions from scholars at all career stages, from sociology and other disciplines. We are especially interested in submissions that employ comparative and historical methods to examine important issues of our day, such as (but not limited to) global market regulation, questions of immigration and citizenship, poverty, environmental insecurity, and protracted race, gender and class inequality. We also invite submissions reflecting on the tradition of policy-relevant research in comparative historical sociology, as well as what the role of comparative and historical methods could or should be in public debate.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 500 words through the electronic abstract submission form. [http://form.jotform.us/form/52724660569160] . The deadline for paper submission is January 30th, 2016.

Conference participants and attendees will be asked to contribute a participation fee of $25 for faculty and $15 for students. Funding to defray costs of travel and lodging will be awarded on a lottery basis for interested graduate students and term faculty participants. Announcements about travel awards will be made after papers are accepted.

For questions, please contact the planning committee at chsminicon@gmail.com.

The organizing committee: Johnnie Lotesta, Aliza Luft, Josh McCabe, Andre Joshua Nickow, Sarah Quinn, Fiona Rose-Greenland, Eric Schoon.

Call for Proposals for Volume 18 of Advances in Medical Sociology Food Systems and Health
(Brea L. Perry, Series Editor
Sara Shostak, Volume Editor)

This is a call for proposals for Volume 18 of Advances in Medical Sociology, which will focus on the broad consequences of food systems for both individual and population health. Additional information about the aims and scope of the volume is provided below. Articles may be empirical contributions or critical commentaries, and may be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. Each volume of Advances in Medical Sociology takes a focused approach to one subject or area of research, similar to a journal special issue. All papers are rigorously peer-reviewed, and the series is abstracted and indexed by Scopus and SocINDEX. If interested in contributing, please submit a one-page proposal detailing the purpose, methodology/approach, findings, implications, and originality/value of the paper. Proposals are due no later than January 15, 2016. Please send your proposal to Sara Shostak, volume editor, at sshostak@brandeis.edu.

Volume 18 Aims and Scope:

Food and nutrition have been the foci of efforts to improve public health since the Sanitation Movement. However, in recent years, the ways in which food is produced, distributed, and consumed have emerged as prominent health and social issues. With rising concerns about the contribution of diet to population health, food systems have attracted the attention of state actors, leading to both innovative and controversial public health interventions, such as citywide soda bans, “veggie prescription” initiatives, farmers’ markets, and school garden programs. At the same time, social movement activism has emerged focused on issues related to food and health, including movements for food justice, food safety, farmworkers’ rights, and community control of land for agricultural production. Meanwhile, many individuals and families struggle to obtain food that is affordable, accessible, and meaningfully connected to their cultures. Drawing on a broad social determinants of health perspective, this volume will highlight how food systems matter for health policy, politics, and the lived experiences and life chances of individuals and communities.

In addition to those mentioned above, topics may include, but are not limited to: building resilient food systems in the era of climate change; community gardens and subsistence farming in cities; interventions to improve access to healthy food, especially in disadvantaged communities; the emergence of alternative food networks, and their implications for local economies and public health; understanding the development and effects of foodways, in both rural and urban contexts; collective memory and the cultural meanings of food; gender, family structure, and consumption; individual and collective strategies for limiting exposure to chemical contaminants in food; next generation food policy to improve population health, and; understanding the health effects of social movement activism focused on the food system.

For more information about Advances in Medical Sociology or any of its award-winning volumes, please visit: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/books/series.htm?id=1057-6290.

Job Postings

Frank H.T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellowships

The Cornell Population Center (CPC) is honored to receive Atlantic Philanthropies’ generous endowment to fund post-doctoral fellows in honor of former Cornell president, Frank H. T. Rhodes.

The announcement for CPC’s next Frank H.T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellow posted today. Screening of applications begins December 15, 2015, and will continue until the position is filled.

Post Dr Assoc (Frank H.T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellow)

The Cornell Population Center (CPC) invites applicants for the Frank H.T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellowships.  The start date for the position will be August 15, 2016 and will be funded for 2 years, subject to a satisfactory first year evaluation.  Selection will be based on scholarly potential, ability to work in multi-disciplinary settings, and the support of a faculty mentor and CPC affiliate at Cornell who will work closely with the post-doctoral associate. Preference will be given to fellows with research interests in areas broadly related to the CPC’s four main foci: families & children; health behaviors & disparities; poverty & inequality; and immigration & diversity.

Applications must include: (a) letter of application, (b) curriculum vita, (c) a statement proposing both an individual research project and how the candidate will engage with a CPC faculty affiliate’s on-going research, (d) examples of written work, (e) a letter from a CPC faculty affiliate agreeing to mentor the candidate, and (f) three letters of recommendation. These materials  must be submitted via Interfolio.  Applicants must apply at:  apply.interfolio.com/32824 (http://apply.interfolio.com/32824).  Applicants must have a Ph.D. in demography, economics, sociology, or another related social science discipline by August 15, 2016. For questions, please contact Erin Oates (eo73@cornell.edu).

Call for Nominations

ASA Call for Nominations

From now and until January 29, 2016, ASA is accepting nominations for its nine major awards. Each August the American Sociological Association proudly presents awards to individuals and groups deserving of recognition.

ASA members are encouraged to submit nominations for the following ASA awards. The deadline for nominations is provided with each award criteria. Each award selection committee is appointed by Committee on Committees and approved by ASA Council. The award selection committees are constituted to review nominations. These awards are presented at the ASA Annual Meeting each August. Remember! The deadline for submission of nominations is January 29, 2016. Currently, the ASA presents the following awards:

Distinguished Book ASA Major Award

Dissertation ASA Major Award

Excellence in the Reporting of Social Issues ASA Major Award

Jessie Bernard ASA Major Award

Cox-Johnson-Frazier ASA Major Award

Award for the Public Understanding of Sociology ASA Major Award

Distinguished Career ASA Major Award for the Practice of Sociology

Distinguished Contributions to Teaching ASA Major Award

W.E.B. DuBois Career of Distinguished Scholarship Award

Any questions or concerns should be sent to Governance at governance@asanet.org. We hope you will help us find those special sociologists who deserve this kind of recognition.

Call for IPM Section Awards

Section on Inequality, Poverty and Mobility Outstanding Book Award

Awarded annually for a book published in the three calendar years preceding the ASA annual meeting at which the award is bestowed. Award Committee Contact: Thomas DiPrete (chair), Columbia University, email: tad61@columbia.edu.

Section on Inequality, Poverty and Mobility Outstanding Article Award

Sponsored annually for an article published in the calendar year preceding the ASA annual meetings. Award Committee Contacts: Matthew Huffman (co-chair), University of California-Irvine, and Youngjoo Cha (co-chair, Indiana University, emails: mhuffman@uci.edu and cha5@indiana.edu.

Section on Inequality, Poverty and Mobility Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award

Sponsored annually for a graduate student paper presented at a professional conference during the calendar year preceding the ASA annual meetings or published during the same time period. Award Committee Contact: Patrick Sharkey, New York University (chair), email: pts1@nyu.edu.

Section on Inequality, Poverty and Mobility’s Robert M. Hauser Distinguished Scholar Award

Awarded annually to mark and celebrate the field’s most fundamental accomplishments. Award Committee Contact:

Florencia Torche, New York University (chair), email:  florencia.torche@nyu.edu.

Section on Inequality, Poverty and Mobility’s William Julius Wilson Early Career Award

Awarded annually to recognize a scholar who has made major contributions early in his/her career. Persons who received their highest degree within the previous ten years shall be eligible to receive this award. Award Committee Chair:

Florencia Torche, New York University (chair), email:  florencia.torche@nyu.edu.

All Awards have a deadline of March 1, 2016.

PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL NOMINEES MUST BE REGISTERED MEMBERS OF THE ASA
TO BE CONSIDERED FOR SECTION AWARDS

 

 

 

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